Local Attractions

Grand Palace Bangkok

Never miss a chance to visit the famous Grand Palace in Bangkok; it’s really worth visiting the Palace to experience the traditional architectural skills with a royal touch. Phra Borom Maha Ratcha Wang (Grand Palace), is a complex of buildings in Bangkok, Thailand. It served as the official residence of the Kings of Thailand from the 18th century onwards. Construction of the Palace began in 1782, during the reign of King Rama I, when he moved the capital across the river from Thonburi to Bangkok. The Palace has been constantly expanded and many additional structures were added over time.

Grand Palace is made up of numerous buildings, halls, pavilions set around open lawns, gardens and courtyards. Its asymmetry and eclectic styles are due to its organic development, with additions and rebuilding being made by successive reigning kings over 200 years of history.

Temple of the Emerald Buddha

The Temple of Emerald Buddha (Wat Phra Kaew ) is regarded as the most sacred Buddhist temple (wat) in Thailand. It is a “potent religio -political symbol and the palladium of Thai society”. It is located in the historic center of Bangkok (district Phra Nakhon), within the precincts of the Grand Palace.

It covers a total area of over 94.5 hectares (234 acres). It has over 100 buildings with “200 years royal history and architectural experimentation” linked to it. The architectural style is named as Rattanakosin style (old Bangkok style).

Thailand’s National Theatre

Thailand’s National Theatre predominantly shows Thai Classical drama and features performances of Khon (drama), where players wear traditional Thai masks. These are truly wonderful productions; extremely ornate costumes, excellent lighting ñ everything you could want. You can see exhibitions of Thai classical dancing and music on the last Friday and Saturday of each month.

The theatre does, however, venture into more international aspects of the medium and it ís worth getting hold of their schedule. Seeing a play at the National Theatre might not be at the top of your priority list.

Khao San Road

Khaosan road is called as the “backpacker ghetto” as it offers various budget accommodations to the travelers at a very cheap price ranging from 200 Baht. “Khaosan” translates as “milled rice”, a reminder that, in former times the street was a major Bangkok rice market. In the last 20 years, however, Khaosan Road has developed into a world famous location for the travelers filled with various restaurants, Bars, clubs and budget Inns. It offers cheap accommodation, ranging from “mattress in a box”-style hotels to reasonably priced 4-star hotels

There are several pubs and bars, where backpackers meet to discuss their travels. The area is internationally known as a center of dancing, partying, and just prior to the traditional Thai New Year (Songkran festival) of April 13 to April 15, water splashing that, usually turns into a huge water fight.


What is Khaosan Road ?              

Khaosan road better known as the "backpacker ghetto" has been emerged as the best backpacker’s capital in the South East Asia over the last 20 years. It is also a base of travel: coaches leave daily for all major tourist destinations in Thailand, from Chiang Mai in the north to Ko Pha Ngan in the south, and there are many relatively inexpensive travel agents who can arrange visas and transportation to the neighboring countries of Cambodia, Laos Malaysia, and Vietnam.

During late evening, the streets turn into bars and music is played, food hawkers sell barbecued insects, exotic snacks for tourists, and there are also locals flogging ping pong shows.

vimanmek mansion

Vimanmek Mansion

The Vimanmek Palace is a former royal palace in Bangkok, Thailand. It is also known as the Vimanmek Teak Mansion or Vimanmek Mansion. It is located in the Dusit Palace complex, nearby Dusit Zoo in Dusit district. Vimanmek Palace was built in 1900 by His Majesty King Rama V by having the Munthatu Rattanaroj Residence in Chuthathuj Rachathan at Ko Sichang, Chonburi, dismantled and reassembled in Dusit Garden. The celebration for the completion of Vimanmek Palace was held on March 27, 1901. It was used as a royal palace by King Rama V for five years until the completion of Amphorn Satharn Villa in 1906.

Bangkok National Museum

Bangkok National Museum

The main branch museum of the National Museums in Thailand. It features exhibits of Thai art and history. The museum was established and opened in 1874 by King Rama V to exhibit relics from the rule of King Rama IV’s rule. Today the galleries contain exhibits covering Thai History back to Neolithic times. The collection includes The King Ram Khamhaeng Inscription, which was inscribed on UNESCO’s Memory of the World Programme Register in 2003 in recognition of its world significance. The museum is located in the former palace of the vice king (or Front Palace), next to the Sanam Luang.

The museum was established and opened in 1874 by King Rama V to exhibit relics from the rule of King Rama IV‘s rule. Today the galleries contain exhibits covering Thai History back to Neolithic times. The collection includes The King Ram Khamhaeng Inscription, which was inscribed on UNESCO’s Memory of the World Programme Register in 2003 in recognition of its world significance.

The Marble Temple

The Marble Temple

Wat Benchamabophit Dusitvanaram is a Buddhist temple (wat) in the Dusit district of Bangkok, Thailand. It is also known as the marble temple. It is one of Bangkok’s most beautiful temples and a major tourist attraction. Construction of the temple began in 1899 at the request of King Chulalongkorn after building his palace nearby. The temple’s name literally means the Temple of the fifth King located nearby Dusit Palace. It was designed by Prince Naris, a half-brother of the king, and is built of Italian marble.

It is one of Bangkok’s most beautiful temples and a major tourist attraction. It typifies Bangkok’s ornate style of high gables, stepped-out roofs and elaborate finials. Merit makers come to the monks of the temple for getting alms every morning. Between 6-7:30 in the morning, the monks line up on Nakhon Phantom with their bowls to receive donations of curry, rice, lotus buds, incense, toiletries and other essentials.

Golden Mount

Golden Mount

Phu Khao Thong (Golden Mountain) is a steep hill inside the Wat Saket compound. It is not a natural outcrop, but an artificial hill. During the reign of King Rama III (1787 – 1851) the decision was made to build a Chedi of huge dimensions to add to the Wat Saket temple. However, the large Chedi collapsed during the construction process because the soft soil beneath would not support it. The resulting mud-and-brick hillock was left alone for about half a century, taking the shape of a natural hill and becoming overgrown with weeds. Since then it looked like a natural small mountain it received its name of “Phu Khao” at that time.

Phu Khao Thong is now a popular Bangkok tourist attraction and has become one of the symbols of the city.

The Temple of the Reclining Buddha

The Temple of the Reclining Buddha

Wat Phra Chettuphon Wimon Mangkhlaram Ratchaworamahawihan , or the former name Wat Pho, also known as The Temple of the Reclining Buddha, is a Buddhist temple in Phra Nakhon district, Bangkok, Thailand, located in the Rattanakosin district directly adjacent to the Grand Palace. Its official full name is Wat Phra Chetuphon Vimolmangklararm Rajwaramahaviharn the temple is also known as the birthplace of traditional Thai massage.

Wat Pho is named after a monastery in India where Buddha is believed to have lived. Prior to the temple’s founding, the site was a center of education for traditional Thai medicine, and statues were created showing yoga positions.

Temple of the Dawn

Temple of the Dawn

Wat Arun is among the best known of Thailand’s landmarks and the first light of the morning reflects off the surface of the temple with pearly iridescence. Wat Arun can be easily accessed through the Chao Phraya River, and ferries travel across the river towards the Maharaj pier. For the foreigners, the temple charges an entrance fee of 50 baht (as of March 2013). Wat Arun figures in one of Thailand’s most colorful festivals, the Royal Kathin and the king travels down in the Thai royal barge procession to present new robes to the monks after their three-month lent period.

The Democracy Monument

The Democracy Monument

The Democracy Monument (is a public monument in the center of Bangkok, capital of Thailand. It occupies a traffic circle on the wide east-west boulevard Thanon Ratchadamnoen Klang, at the intersection of Thanon Dinso. The monument is roughly halfway between Sanam Luang, the former royal cremation ground in front of Wat Phra Kaew, and the temple of the Golden Mount (Phu Kao Thong). It is situated near Khaosan Road so you may visit sometimes during your trip.

The wings are 24 meters high, and this is also the radius of the base of the monument, marking the fact that the 1932 coup took place on 24 June. The central turret is three meters high, representing the month of June, which is the third month of the traditional Thai calendar.

Loha Prasat Castle

Loha Prasat Castle

Loha Prasat Castle is a Buddhist temple located between Ratchadamnoen Klang and Mahachak Roads, in the Phra Nakhon district of Bangkok. The name of the temple means “Royal Niece”, for it was built by King Rama III in 1846, for his niece, the princess Mom Chao Ying Sommanus Wattanavadi. There is an amulet market at Wat Ratchanaddaram. Wat Ratchanaddaram’s best known component is the uniquely shaped pagoda called Loha Prasat.

It is a multi-tiered structure 36 m high and having 37 metal spires, signifying the 37 virtues toward enlightenment. In 2005, the temple was submitted to UNESCO for consideration as a future World Heritage Site.

The Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall

The Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall

The Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall is a former reception hall within Dusit Palace in Bangkok, Thailand. The Throne Hall is a two storey construction with a large dome (49.5 m high) in the center, surrounded by six smaller domes. The domes and walls are covered with paintings by Professor Galileo Chini and Carlo Riguli depicting the history of the Chakri Dynasty, from the first to the sixth reign. There are paintings on every ceiling and wall of the dome depicting the history of the Chakri Dynasty.

As the Throne Hall is a royal premise, visitors to the Throne Hall should be aware that an appropriate dress is required for entry; this means sleeved shirts (including short-sleeved ones) and trousers for men or long skirts for women. Shorts, ripped jeans, short skirts and sleeveless shirts are prohibited. Women in long trousers are not considered suitable. If needed, appropriate attire (a sarong) can be purchased there. All cameras and mobile phones must be kept in provided lockers at no cost. There is an entry fee for the Throne Hall, even if you have already paid to enter the Dusit Gardens. A recorded guide is available in several languages.

China Town Bangkok

China Town Bangkok

Chinatown is a colorful, exotic and busy area, packed with market stalls and probably the greatest concentration of gold shops in the city. Packed with market stalls, street-side restaurants and a dense concentration of gold shops, Chinatown is an experience not to miss. The Chinese community, relocated here from Rattanakosin (Old City) in the 1700’s, still continues their own traditions and religious practices, and the area is quite unlike the rest of Bangkok.

China town is famous for food; there are so many things to eat here. It could get crowded during festivals but there is something to have fun every day. Especially during the vegetarian festival! It’s a must to visit.

Giant Swing

Giant Swing

Sao Ching Cha (Giant Swing) is a religious structure in Bangkok, Phra Nakhon district, located in front of Wat Suthat temple. It was formerly used an old Brahmin ceremony, and is one of Bangkok’s tourist attractions. The Giant Swing was originally constructed in 1784 in front of the Devasathan shrine by King Rama I. During the reign of Rama II the swing ceremony was discontinued as the swing had become structurally damaged by lightning. In 1920 it was renovated and moved to its current location in order to make space for a gas plant. The ceremony was again performed until 1935, when it was discontinued after several fatal accidents.

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